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"And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free." - John 8:32
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Author:  Jim Kouri
Bio: Jim Kouri
Date:  November 29, 2006
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Illegal Alien and American Indicted in US for Helping Taliban

by Jim Kouri, CPP

A four-count federal indictment was delivered by a grand jury against a US citizen and a Pakistani national illegally in the country on an expired student visa for a conspiracy to aid the Taliban, according to a US Attorney in Houston.

Kobie Diallo Williams, also known as Abdul Kabeer and Abdul Kabir, 33, a US citizen and Houston resident, and Adnan Babar Mirza, 29, a Pakistani national who overstayed a student visa, are charged with conspiring to train with firearms with a goal to fight with the Taliban against coalition forces in the Middle East and providing approximately $350 in cash to support terrorist groups.

Mirza is also charged with three violations of federal firearms law. The four count indictment was returned under seal by a Houston grand jury on Wednesday, Nov. 22, 2006, and unsealed on Tuesday after the appearance of both men before a US magistrate judge.

"In this post 9/11 era, threats against our international security efforts are taken most seriously," said US Attorney Don DeGabrielle.

"While these subjects did not operate at a high level of sophistication in comparison with the 9/11 hijackers, the expressed goal was to aid the Taliban by training to carry out jihad against coalition troops in the Middle East," said FBI Special Agent in Charge Roderick Beverly.

Kobie Diallo Williams surrendered himself to members of the FBI's Joint Terrorism Task Force on Tuesday, while Adnan Babar Mirza, who has been in the custody of the Immigration and Customs Enforcement on related immigration violations, was transferred into the custody of JTTF agents Tuesday morning.

Both Williams and Mirza have been ordered to remain in federal custody without bond pending further criminal proceedings.

According to allegations in the indictment, Williams and Mirza, a citizen of Pakistan who entered the United States on a student visa on Aug. 15, 2001, allegedly viewed the United States and coalition military forces on the ground in Afghanistan and Iraq as invaders and in April 2005 agreed that they should travel to the Middle East to fight with the Taliban to engage in battlefield jihad.

To hone their skills in anticipation for battlefield jihad, the indictment alleges Williams and Mirza agreed to train with firearms at various locations located in Harris and surrounding counties in Texas. On at least eight occasions between May 20, 2005, and June 17, 2006, the men engaged in firearms training, and at times in reconnaissance training.

As part of and during the alleged conspiracy, Williams and Mirza are accused of agreeing to offer financial support to Taliban fighters and their families. Federal law prohibits contributions of goods or services to the Taliban, one of several specially designated global terrorist organizations. Williams allegedly provided support -- $200 on or about June 28, 2005, and another $150 on May 25, 2006 -- intended for Taliban members or their families.

As a student visa holder, Mirza is prohibited from possessing firearms. In addition, once his student visa expired on December 12, 2005, Mirza's status changed to that of being an illegal alien in the United States. Illegal aliens are also prohibited from possessing firearms. The indictment charges Mirza in three counts of unlawfully possessing firearms during three firearms training sessions occurring in May 2005, March 2006 and May 2006 (Counts Two through Four).

If convicted of the conspiracy charge set forth in Count One, Williams and Mirza face a maximum punishment of five years imprisonment, a fine of $250,000 and three years supervised release. Each of the three firearms alleged against Mirza in Counts Two through Four carry a maximum penalty of 10 years imprisonment, a fine of $250,000 and three years supervised release, upon conviction.

The investigation resulting in the charges was led by the Houston Division of the FBI and the agency's JTTF with participation by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the Houston Police Department, the Texas Department of Public Safety and the Sheriff's Offices of San Jacinto and Montgomery Counties.

Jim Kouri
Chief of Police Magazine (Contributing Editor)

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Biography - Jim Kouri

Jim Kouri, CPP is currently fifth vice-president of the National Association of Chiefs of Police. He's former chief at a New York City housing project in Washington Heights nicknamed "Crack City" by reporters covering the drug war in the 1980s. In addition, he served as director of public safety at a New Jersey university and director of security for a number of organizations. He's also served on the National Drug Task Force and trained police and security officers throughout the country. He writes for many police and crime magazines including Chief of Police, Police Times, The Narc Officer, Campus Law Enforcement Journal, and others. He's appeared as on-air commentator for over 100 TV and radio news and talk shows including Oprah, McLaughlin Report, CNN Headline News, MTV, Fox News, etc. His book Assume The Position is available at Amazon.Com, Booksamillion.com, and can be ordered at local bookstores. Kouri holds a bachelor of science in criminal justice and master of arts in public administration and he's a board certified protection professional.


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