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"And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free." - John 8:32
WEBCommentary Contributor
Author:  Michael J. Gaynor
Bio: Michael J. Gaynor
Date:  March 7, 2016
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Topic category:  Partisan Politics

"True Conservatives" Support Donald Trump, Because Clinton Judicial Appointments Would "Fundamentally Transform" the United States Notwithstanding the Constitution Instead of Making It Great Again

A "true conservative" would be supporting Trump as most electable instead of trying to make him unelectable.

The Buckley Rule, promulgated by the late William F. Buckley, Jr., founder of National Review, is "Nominate the most conservative candidate who is electable."

It is a good rule.

Apparently Rich Lowry, the current editor of National Review, has his own rule: "Vilify the most conservative candidate who is electable and then nominate another who will lose."

This year the most conservative candidate who is electable is Donald Trump.

Trump describes himself as "a common sense conservative" and a deal maker.

He is both.

He has become more conservative over time, like Ronald Reagan.

Today the most electable conservative must be both "a common sense conservative" and a deal maker.

That's what most Americans crave, and they won't be bullied or brainwashed into accepting less.

Neither of Trump's chief Republican rivals, professional politicians and first-term Senators Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio, is both.

Cruz may be the most consistent conservative, but he is not a deal maker and a President of the United States is not a dictator of the United States, much less ruler of the earth.

Presidents must deal with Congress, 50 states and other world leaders.

That's necessary, not optional.

Being a professional politician this year is not a job requirement for President this year. It's more handicap than help.

Being a concerned citizen with huge accomplishments in business and the funds to run suffices.

Cruz's famous filibuster earned him lots of media attention, but it was futile.

Further, Cruz started running for President before he accomplished anything of important for the United States, suggesting that his race is more about his burning ambition than his political principles.

The equally ambitious Rubio IS a dealmaker, but the only big deal he made as a rookie senator was to join the Gang of Eight to push through the United States Senate an unacceptable "comprehensive immigration reform" bill providing a path to citizenship for illegal aliens.

Rubio's flip flop on the principal issue on which he was elected a United States Senator by Floridians reveals his unfitness to be President. He showed himself to be untrustworthy, not presidential or flexible.

Flexibility is importance in getting big things done, but betrayal is disqualifying.

Trump's appeal extends well beyond the Republican basis and makes him electable.

Efforts to discredit Trump by "rule or ruin" conservatives and Republicans, such as the issue of National Review that Lowry devoted to attacks on Trump, are not what Buckley would have expected in these dangerous days.

It is vital that a progressive like Hillary Clinton or Bernie Sanders not appoint Supreme Court Justices and federal judges.

Trump has pledged to appoint Justices like the late Justice Scalia.

The anti-Trump movement will have itself to blame if Hillary Clinton or Bernie Sanders become President and appoints.

To win, the Republican presidential candidate must win more electoral votes than Mitt Romney won in 2012.

Trump is best able to do that.

A "true conservative" would be supporting Trump as most electable instead of trying to make him unelectable.

Michael J. Gaynor

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Biography - Michael J. Gaynor

Michael J. Gaynor has been practicing law in New York since 1973. A former partner at Fulton, Duncombe & Rowe and Gaynor & Bass, he is a solo practitioner admitted to practice in New York state and federal courts and an Association of the Bar of the City of New York member.

Gaynor graduated magna cum laude, with Honors in Social Science, from Hofstra University's New College, and received his J.D. degree from St. John's Law School, where he won the American Jurisprudence Award in Evidence and served as an editor of the Law Review and the St. Thomas More Institute for Legal Research. He wrote on the Pentagon Papers case for the Review and obscenity law for The Catholic Lawyer and edited the Law Review's commentary on significant developments in New York law.

The day after graduating, Gaynor joined the Fulton firm, where he focused on litigation and corporate law. In 1997 Gaynor and Emily Bass formed Gaynor & Bass and then conducted a general legal practice, emphasizing litigation, and represented corporations, individuals and a New York City labor union. Notably, Gaynor & Bass prevailed in the Second Circuit in a seminal copyright infringement case, Tasini v. New York Times, against newspaper and magazine publishers and Lexis-Nexis. The U.S. Supreme Court affirmed, 7 to 2, holding that the copyrights of freelance writers had been infringed when their work was put online without permission or compensation.

Gaynor currently contributes regularly to www.MichNews.com, www.RenewAmerica.com, www.WebCommentary.com, www.PostChronicle.com and www.therealitycheck.org and has contributed to many other websites. He has written extensively on political and religious issues, notably the Terry Schiavo case, the Duke "no rape" case, ACORN and canon law, and appeared as a guest on television and radio. He was acknowledged in Until Proven Innocent, by Stuart Taylor and KC Johnson, and Culture of Corruption, by Michelle Malkin. He appeared on "Your World With Cavuto" to promote an eBay boycott that he initiated and "The World Over With Raymond Arroyo" (EWTN) to discuss the legal implications of the Schiavo case. On October 22, 2008, Gaynor was the first to report that The New York Times had killed an Obama/ACORN expose on which a Times reporter had been working with ACORN whistleblower Anita MonCrief.

Gaynor's email address is gaynormike@aol.com.


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