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"And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free." - John 8:32
WEBCommentary Contributor
Author:  Michael J. Gaynor
Bio: Michael J. Gaynor
Date:  July 23, 2012
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Topic category:  Elections - Politics, Polling, etc.

Seemingly Strong Personal Values Can Elect (and Re-elect) a President Too

Respect for the office of the President of the United States generally is a good thing, but telling the truth is more important.

In an op ed titled "Romney's campaign of transformation" published in Newsday on February 15, 2007, James P. Pinkerton concluded: "...innovation and transformation seem inevitable, even esssential. After eight years of slippery opportunism, and after eight more years of 'moral clarity' that has become indistinguishable from myopic obsession, perhaps voters in 2008 will embrace a candidate who has demonstrated that he or she has sound personal values, even as we learn from our mistakes--that we must learn anew and act enough."

Pinkerton supported Mitt Romney, writing:

"...America desperately needs a president who can learn and adapt--and get things done.

"Romney's career as a venture capitalist...is certainly proof of his acumen. And, at the same time, any baby boomer who has been happily married to the same woman for 37 years deserves a medal for good conduct during sexual revolution."

Romney is a man of strong personal value who even tithes to his church.

Pinkerton was yearning for someone from outside Washington, D.C to come to the rescue and asked, "does anybody really believe that Hillary Rodham Clinton or John McCain, for example, have demonstrated the capacity to look upon the current mess with fresh eyes?"

McCain became the 2008 Republican presidential nominee, and assured the voters that his Democrat rival, Barack Obama, was "a fine young man."

Obama won easily.

As I wrote in "History lesson: the presidential candidate who scares more voters loses" (www.renewamerica.com/columns/gaynor/111201): "Obama ran as the candidate of hope and change when most people yearned for change and were willing to entrust their hope to the charismatic Obama instead of the cranky old man who described Obama as 'a fine young man' instead of a stealth socialist who eschewed traditional American values and wanted to 'fundamentally transform' America."

The liberal media establishment either was oblivious or complicit in concealing the troublesome truth about Obama and enthusiastically promoted his election as "historic."

This year Obama is running for reelection and Romney will be the Republican presidential nominee.

Romney better do what McCain did not--win.

To do that, Romney needs to show that his idea of transformation is consistent with the limits of government and the possibilities of freedom, but also must not stipulate that Obama is "a fine man."

That should be easy, since there's plenty of detrimental information about Obama and his presidential campaign that is not generally known and Team Obama is suggesting that Romney is a liar, or a felon, or both, who must be hiding something bad.

Respect for the office of the President of the United States generally is a good thing, but telling the truth is more important.

Team Obama fooled the voters once.

America can't afford for the voters to be fooled again.

Michael J. Gaynor

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Biography - Michael J. Gaynor

Michael J. Gaynor has been practicing law in New York since 1973. A former partner at Fulton, Duncombe & Rowe and Gaynor & Bass, he is a solo practitioner admitted to practice in New York state and federal courts and an Association of the Bar of the City of New York member.

Gaynor graduated magna cum laude, with Honors in Social Science, from Hofstra University's New College, and received his J.D. degree from St. John's Law School, where he won the American Jurisprudence Award in Evidence and served as an editor of the Law Review and the St. Thomas More Institute for Legal Research. He wrote on the Pentagon Papers case for the Review and obscenity law for The Catholic Lawyer and edited the Law Review's commentary on significant developments in New York law.

The day after graduating, Gaynor joined the Fulton firm, where he focused on litigation and corporate law. In 1997 Gaynor and Emily Bass formed Gaynor & Bass and then conducted a general legal practice, emphasizing litigation, and represented corporations, individuals and a New York City labor union. Notably, Gaynor & Bass prevailed in the Second Circuit in a seminal copyright infringement case, Tasini v. New York Times, against newspaper and magazine publishers and Lexis-Nexis. The U.S. Supreme Court affirmed, 7 to 2, holding that the copyrights of freelance writers had been infringed when their work was put online without permission or compensation.

Gaynor currently contributes regularly to www.MichNews.com, www.RenewAmerica.com, www.WebCommentary.com, www.PostChronicle.com and www.therealitycheck.org and has contributed to many other websites. He has written extensively on political and religious issues, notably the Terry Schiavo case, the Duke "no rape" case, ACORN and canon law, and appeared as a guest on television and radio. He was acknowledged in Until Proven Innocent, by Stuart Taylor and KC Johnson, and Culture of Corruption, by Michelle Malkin. He appeared on "Your World With Cavuto" to promote an eBay boycott that he initiated and "The World Over With Raymond Arroyo" (EWTN) to discuss the legal implications of the Schiavo case. On October 22, 2008, Gaynor was the first to report that The New York Times had killed an Obama/ACORN expose on which a Times reporter had been working with ACORN whistleblower Anita MonCrief.

Gaynor's email address is gaynormike@aol.com.


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Copyright 2012 by Michael J. Gaynor
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